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Training Announcement: Latent Print Examiner

In partnership with the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), NFSTC is pleased to announce that Latent Print Examiner Training will once again be provided at no cost to eligible applicants. The program will lead entry-level latent print examiner trainees through a series of course offerings designed to meet the International Association for Identification (IAI) certification requirement for technical training. The Latent Print Examiner Training Program consists of 11 courses offered in 5 two-week instructional sessions at NFSTC’s training facilities in Largo, Florida. Participants will be required to complete online coursework, assignments, assessments and practical exercises between onsite sessions.

To be eligible for participation in this training program, applicants must:

  • Have less than 6 months of experience in latent print examination at the time of application submission.
  • Work for a U.S. publicly funded state, local or tribal agency as a professional practitioner in law enforcement or forensic services.

Preference will be given to individuals whose current primary responsibility is latent print examination.

When: The training is scheduled to begin in July 2012 and conclude in November 2012.

Applications will be accepted through May 13, 2012, 11:59 PM EDT.

To learn more about eligibility requirements and how to apply, please download the full training announcement:

  FY11 Pattern Evidence - Latent Print Training Announcement


Questions related to the application process should be directed to Jessica Ward, NFSTC instructional services support associate, at Jessica.Ward@nfstc.org or call (727) 549-6067, Ext. 155.

This training program is provided in partnership with the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Cooperative Agreement Award #2011-DN-BX-K571.

Plan now for your next external DNA audit

Are you planning your 2013 laboratory budget and need to schedule an external DNA audit? NFSTC is available to conduct a quality assurance audit of your laboratory, no matter what part of the country you’re located. A team of professionals from our nationwide pool of auditors will be carefully selected for your laboratory’s location, size and instrumentation.

Since 2002, NFSTC has provided more than 700 of these critical audits nationwide as part of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) program. NFSTC’s courteous auditors are trained to the FBI Quality Assurance Standards and currently qualified DNA analysts, and will conduct your audit in compliance with NIJ criteria.

As per NIJ’s FY 2012 DNA Backlog Reduction Program, your audit costs can be included in your grant application. Rest assured that NFSTC will coordinate your audit team in compliance with NIJ solicitation criteria and our costs have been vetted according to GSA.

For more information and to receive a free, no-obligations quote for your laboratory’s next external DNA audit, please visit the External DNA Audits page on our website.

NFSTC wins BizTech Best Collaboration award

A joint effort from NFSTC and the University of Tennessee Law Enforcement Innovation Center (LEIC) has won the Best Collaboration award at the 2012 BizTech Innovation Summit Awards & Expo. The long-distance collaborative team was recognized for their work in developing a cutting-edge virtual reality crime scene training program, Investigator-Virtual Reality (I-VR).

The team was led by NFSTC’s technology services manager, Danny Nichols, and also included Advanced Interactive Systems, a leading gaming software development company in California. The training was developed for law enforcement and features online training accompanied by simulated crime scenes where investigators can try out their newly acquired skills in a virtual environment.

NFSTC is honored to have won and wishes to recognize the University of Tennessee LEIC for their commitment to success on the project. NFSTC would also like to acknowledge its instructional design and technology services teams for once again making the seemingly impossible a reality!

The winners were announced today during a luncheon held at the Tampa Convention Center in the heart of downtown Tampa, Florida. The aim of the BizTech Innovation Summit is to “identify and acknowledge the substantive gains Tampa Bay area businesses are making in the ways they are developing, employing and utilizing technology for their own companies and their clients.”

Which portable light source and reagent reveal the most latent prints?

A study comparing the fingermark detection capabilities of laser and light-emitting diode (LED) light sources has just been released in the technology evaluations section of NFSTC’s website. The study, which examines the performance of three lasers and an LED light source with three chemical reagents, was also published in the latest issue of IAI’s Journal of Forensic Identification.

The light sources used in the study were Coherent TracER lasers operating at 460 nm, 532 nm and 577 nm and the Rofin Polilight Flare Plus LED operating at 505 nm. The three chemical reagents investigated for their ability to enhance latent prints under these light sources were indanedione, genipin and lawsone. Which light source and reagent combination revealed the most latent prints? Download the technology evaluation report to find out.

To download other reports, visit NFSTC’s Technology Evaluations main page, or jump directly to the Biology & DNA, Chemistry and Crime Scene Investigation pages.

This study was funded by NIJ through the Forensic Technology Center of Excellence operated by NFSTC.

NFSTC a finalist for BizTech Best Collaboration award

A joint effort from NFSTC and the University of Tennessee Law Enforcement Innovation Center (LEIC) has been named a finalist for the Best Collaboration award in the upcoming 2012 BizTech Innovation Awards. NFSTC and LEIC teamed up to develop a cutting-edge virtual reality crime scene training program; the long-distance collaboration also included Advanced Interactive Systems, a leading gaming software development company in California.

The program,  Investigator-Virtual Reality (I-VR), features online training accompanied by simulated crime scenes where investigators can try out their newly acquired skills in a virtual environment. The result is investigators who are individually trained in a fraction of the time needed for traditional training – at little or no cost to their agency.

Topics covered include crime scene management, photography, latent print processing and DNA collection. To learn more and to register (law enforcement only), go to: http://leic.tennessee.edu/online/ivr.html.